Facebook convinced time travel is real after ‘mobile phone’ spotted in WWII pic

Conspiracy theorists are convinced that a bizarre feature in a photograph from the 1940s is proof that time travel is real.

The snap taken in 1943 in the Icelandic capital Reykjavik shows a crowd of locals and GIs from World War Two walking along a pavement.

But the picture has gone viral after its owner spotted a detail that seemed incredibly out of place, reported The US Sun.

In the photo, a man in the background looks at the camera with his hand to the side of his face.

And the picture sparked rumours among time-travel believers that the man was clutching a mobile phone to his ear.

The first-ever mobile phone – the Motorola DynaTAC 8000X – went on sale in 1973, exactly 30 years after the photo was taken.

Kristján Hoffman, whose family have had the photo for decades, shared the picture on the Facebook group Gamlar ljósmyndir, meaning “Old Photographs”.

The photo, taken during the height of the Second World War, shows Iceland’s capital when occupied by Allied troops.

Kristján wrote on Facebook: “The American army is taking over Icelandic splendour, as you can see.

“One thing that draws attention to this beautiful picture is that above the window, in the corner in the middle of the picture, a man is leaning and is on a cell phone.”

The apparent sight of a time traveller in a photo from over 70 years ago sparked a big debate online.

Some said that the man was simply scratching his ear, while others speculated that he was clutching his pipe, or even holding his watch up to check if it was working.

This last theory is further boosted by the fact that the man is standing next to a watch shop in the photograph.

In the comments underneath, Kristján seemed to double-down on his time-traveller claims, adding: “He’s in a stupor, standing alone and wearing a different headdress than the others and a scarf and acting like we would do today.

“He has an overview of the square and nothing like having a conversation with someone on a smartphone.”

Another commenter joked that the photograph was proof that Icelanders had “already invented the mobile phone way before anyone else!”

Photographs from the past are often seized upon as “proof” of time travel.

Recently, conspiracists spotted a man “clutching a mobile phone” in a 1940s photo.

The picture, taken on a beach in Cornwall, south west England, in September 1943, shows a man in a brown suit looking at an item in his hands that looks suspiciously like a mobile phone.

But sceptics were quick to pour scorn on the conspiracy, insisting the man was simply rolling a cigarette.

Other historic images have also caused a stir among time travel believers in recent weeks.

Bonkers theories started to swirl regarding an Ancient Greek tombstone after people spotted a woman using a laptop.

They claimed it was proof that a time traveller took a portable computer back to when the marble relief was sculpted in 100BC.

It came after art fans were baffled at a woman “holding an iPhone” in a painting from the 1860s.

Another man was spotted thumbing what looks like an iPhone in a 1930s mural of a scene from 17th-century New England.

And Apple boss Tim Cook joked he had found one of his firm’s gadgets in a 350-year-old masterpiece in Amsterdam.

This story appeared in The US Sun and is reproduced with permission.

Originally published as Facebook convinced time travel is real after ‘mobile phone’ spotted in WWII pic

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